Getting a Suntan is very dangerous, but NICE warns you NEED your Vitamin D

NICE have further warned the public about the dangers of sun exposure while getting a suntan.

There is no safe or healthy way to get a tan from sunlight, new guidance from the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) has warned.

The health watchdog’s latest guidance also says an existing tan provides little protection against sun exposure.

Many adults in Britain have low levels of Vitamin D and the NICE guidance states that some exposure to sunlight can help to build this up.

NICE also says it is not possible to get enough Vitamin D by sitting next to a closed sunny window, or from sunlight between October and March in the UK.

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Everyone should take some form of Vitamin D

United Kingdom government officials are proposing plans whereby everyone should consider taking Vitamin D supplements to counter the lack of sunshine in the UK.

The Scientific Advisory Committee draft guidelines on Nutrition suggest, from the age of one, 10 microgram pills be taken to ensure people get enough. The plans are now being consulted on until 23 September 2015.

Current advice is only at risk groups – including pregnant women, under fives and over 65s and those with darker skin – should take Vitamin D supplements. The risk of getting too much Vitamin D is considered to be extremely low.

The news comes after the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE), which advises the NHS on treatments, suggested Vitamin D should be given more widely to counter a hidden epidemics of deficiency. National surverys suggest that around a fifth of adults and 8 to 24% of children may have low Vitamin D status.

People get most of their Vitamin D from the action of sunlight on their skin. However, from mid-October to the beginning of April in the UK there is no ambient ultraviolet sunlight of the appropriate wavelength. The amount of Vitamin D in food is also of a concern as there is very little amounts,if any, in food, unlike many of the the other Vitamins.

The low level of sunlight during winter months means people in the UK are at risk.

The NICE guidelines called for more supplements that are available and suitable and certified for those who are most at-risk.

Low Vitamin-D genes linked to MS

A new study suggests that, people who are genetically prone to low Vitamin-D levels are at increased risk of Multiple Sclerosis.

Based upon the DNA profiles of tens of thousands of people of European descent, the findings suggest and gain weight to the theory that the sunshine vitamin plays a role in MS.
Scientists are already testing whether giving people extra vitamin D might prevent or ease MS. Experts say the jury is still out.

If you think you may not be getting sufficient Vitamin D from sunlight or from your diet, you should discuss this with your doctor.


Vitamin D

  • Is important for healthy bones
  • We make it in our skin when we are exposed to sunlight, but some of it comes from our diet
  • Good food sources include oily fish, eggs, fortified breakfast cereals and fortified fat spreads
  • Some people – the elderly, pregnant and breastfeeding women, babies, children under the age of five, and those of Afro-Caribbean, Asian and African decent as well as those who do not get much sun – may not get enough and need supplements

Research around the world already shows MS is more common in less sunny countries, further from the equator.

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Vitamin D: NICE calls for Halal options to Prevent Deficiency

The National Institute for Care and Health Excellence (UK) is about to publish guidelines for the prevention of Vitamin D Deficiency after a long period of consultation.

Vitamin D is essential for skeletal growth and bone health. Severe Vitamin D deficiency can result in rickets (among children) and osteomalacia (among children and adults). Some scientific research suggests that low Vitamin D levels contribute to a risk of diabetes, cardiovascular disease, dementia, infertility, MS and many other diseases. National surveys suggest that the majority of Asian/Afro-Caribbeans in the UK may have low Vitamin D status. Continue reading