Daily Vitamin D supplementation ‘heals damaged hearts’

With so many people struggling with heart disease throughout the world, its only natural that a lot of effort goes into fighting against it. But few new things seem to actually work against the condition, but sometimes the only reason we can’t seem to find a new solution is because we’re looking in the wrong place.

According to a team of researchers from the University of Leeds, School of Medicine, heart function is improved through Vitamin D3.

It is no secret how important we at Halal Treatments consider Vitamin D to be, especially officially and independently fully certified (ingredients, processes and facilities) Halal Vitamin D. This new study further increases the importance of using Vitamin D supplements to ensure you body remains healthy.

Heart failure, which can lead to shortness of breath and exhaustion, affects about 900,000 people in the UK and more than 23 million worldwide.

Vitamin D levels are boosted by exposing the skin to sunlight. It is often lacking in heart failure patients because they tend to be older and less likely to engage in outdoor activities. Researchers studied 160 patients being treated for heart failure using a variety of proven drug treatments and pacemakers. Participants who took a vitamin D3 supplement daily for one year experienced an improvement in heart function not seen in those given a dummy pill.

Lead scientist Dr Klaus Witte, from the School of Medicine at Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, said: “This is a significant breakthrough for patients. It is the first evidence that Vitamin D3 can improve heart function of people with heart muscle weakness, known as heart failure. These findings could make a significant difference to the care of heart failure patients.”

Because it is dangerous to spend too much time in the sun and the fact a lot of us work inside such as in offices, we do not get enough Vitamin D which is why it is essential to take Vitamin D supplements, that have been certified Halal, such as Pro D3 and SunVit D3 as they offer the purest form of Vitamin D intake.


Find out more on the research at – Vitamin D3 Heart Function by University of Leeds

Low Vitamin-D genes linked to MS

A new study suggests that, people who are genetically prone to low Vitamin-D levels are at increased risk of Multiple Sclerosis.

Based upon the DNA profiles of tens of thousands of people of European descent, the findings suggest and gain weight to the theory that the sunshine vitamin plays a role in MS.
Scientists are already testing whether giving people extra vitamin D might prevent or ease MS. Experts say the jury is still out.

If you think you may not be getting sufficient Vitamin D from sunlight or from your diet, you should discuss this with your doctor.

Vitamin D

  • Is important for healthy bones
  • We make it in our skin when we are exposed to sunlight, but some of it comes from our diet
  • Good food sources include oily fish, eggs, fortified breakfast cereals and fortified fat spreads
  • Some people – the elderly, pregnant and breastfeeding women, babies, children under the age of five, and those of Afro-Caribbean, Asian and African decent as well as those who do not get much sun – may not get enough and need supplements

Research around the world already shows MS is more common in less sunny countries, further from the equator.

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Vitamin D: NICE Guidelines on Halal recommendation

The big news about the NICE guidelines is the recognition that Halal supplements must be made readily available to at risk patients.  It follows that healthcare professionals should consider HALAL when recommending or prescribing vitamin D products to Muslim patients, or producing a formulary of vitamin D products.  Muslims in the UK are among the most at risk of vitamin D deficiency and consequently the health conditions associated with vitamin D deficiency.

Professor Mike Kelly, who was involved in producing the NICE guidelines, said: “Around 10 million people in England may have low vitamin D status and so could be at risk of health problems – and they may not know it.”


NICE have clearly defined Halal as

“foods or non-food items such as cosmetics or pharmaceuticals permitted by and prepared according to Islamic law.”

It is presumed that only products carrying independent certification from recognised Halal Certification organisation will be recommended as a Halal option. This is the only way that healthcare professionals can comply with the NICE guidelines.

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